Karmanos Cancer Institute Raises $2.8 Million, Creates 24-Hour Clinic

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The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute raised more than $2.8 million at its 33rd Annual Dinner, held April 25 at General Motors Design Dome. This year’s dinner set new fundraising records for Karmanos, making it one of Detroit’s most successful events.

Karmanos had raised $2.3 million through sponsors and supporters leading up to the Annual Dinner, and the event itself raised $500,000 more. This year’s dinner will benefit the expansion of the institute’s Intensive Care Unit and create a 24-hour acute care clinic.

“[My wife} and I were honored to serve as chairs of this outstanding event and to continue GM’s long time support for the Karmanos Cancer Institute,” said Bob Ferguson, one of the Annual Dinner Chairs and senior vice president of Global Public Policy at General Motors. “We know how important it is to provide cancer patients with the care and treatment they deserve and are thrilled to be able to support such a vital and important organization in Detroit.”

This is the fifth consecutive year that a member of GM’s senior leadership has chaired Karmanos’ Annual Dinner, which was held in the newly-remodeled GM Design Dome, making it the first fundraising event to be held in the futuristic space.

Nearly 600 guests attended the event, enjoying live music from a quartet from the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Hank Winchester, anchor and reporter for WDIV Local 4, served as emcee once again.

Event highlights include new production Cadillac vehicles on display, a seated dinner, a new Karmanos Wine Cellar services featuring high-end wines for purchase, a brief program, and dancing.

“Once again, General Motors, the GM Foundation and all of our generous sponsors and contributors have stepped up to the plate for the benefit of our patients,” said Gerold Bepler, M.D., Ph.D., president and CEO, Karmanos Cancer Institute. “Through everyone’s support, Karmanos can continue its mission of providing exceptional cancer care and innovative cancer research that translates to better, more effective treatments in the future.”

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